Kensey McMahon has been in a mile long lake, the Gulf of Mexico and the National Open Water Swimming Championships in the United States.

500 yards in the splash pool? That’s no big deal.

“Those long races, most of the children stay away, she’s almost like sprint swimming coach Mike Dingfield,” Putonghua. “Eight or 20 laps has not been able to cover up her warm-up.”

Mcmahon filled the swimming pool with the fastest speed, long endurance and several American time. It became the first wild horse to be selected as the first “coastal girl swimmer” in the era alliance.

High school has completed third long swimming competitions in Stuart 4A national championships, and the automatic 500 yards freestyle competition time (4:45.85) will blow four other to seven seconds. At that time, Mcmahon had won the recognition of the people of the United States.

She was the first to break the 4:46 in a local girl since 500 in a state of Carman met Anja Bolles tour achievement 44.632003, and add a half dozen other swimmers in the northeast of Florida, Trina Jackson Janelle Atkinson and Ashley Whitney, which is beyond time.

Mcmahon’s stamina comes from a game that can’t be controlled by four walls in a swimming pool. She said she was interested in long distance swimming for the first time only a new project.

“There’s one more thing to check on this book,” she said.

At that time, she didn’t think of being a top player in open water. Mcmahon said she took part in her first open water project at the age of 11 in a Meersburg project.

She said, “at the very beginning, I played a small ball, this is a exhausted game, because it’s an hour’s competition, and you will be pushed to all directions.”

But she persisted, and as the distance grew higher, she continued to become better.

After qualifying, the possible national 5K open water Championships in Losangeles near Lake Kase lake, she took all the seventh Americans, regardless of age, in the elite race to win the Olympic silver medalist Haley Anderson 2012.

She learned to overcome the rough sea waves, the cold sea water and the full contact swimming in the movement of no one in the same lane.

“This may be a 60 or 70 person to the first buoy, you get there, so you won’t be knocked down at the beginning,” she said.

Mcmahon, who has been attending national conferences in Mandarin class for four years, said her experience helped her to become a leader.

“I used to be very anxious,” she said. “If I go swimming or something, I’ll be nervous next time I meet. You can’t do that at a high school meeting. ”

“It helps young people, who has the level of experience,” Dingfield said. “It helps motivate our young swimmers and shows that you can do it with some effort and determination.”

This year, Mcmahon set the goal of the team at the beginning: finally back to the top of the gateway meeting. The wild horse succeeded in beating Fletcher for the first time in 10 years.

Mcmahon has signed a contract to go to University of Alabama to swim, where she plans to swim 1650 of the longest NCAA projects. In December, Mcmahon completed second of the total distance in American swimming Speedo Winter Youth Championships in East Knoxville, Tenn.

But when she chases the dream of swimming in the pool, she also wants to spatter in the open space – perhaps an international flower.

“Swimming is not like swimming,” Mcmahon said. “Every time you do this, you’ll get something completely different.”